Ladakh Standoff: China prepares to ramp up tension with India, deploys nuclear missiles near LAC

The confrontation took a turn for the worse after Indian and Chinese soldiers clashed in the Galwan Valley on the night of June 15-16. The incident led to the martyrdom of 20 Indian soldiers while more than 100 were killed on the Chinese side.

Ladakh Standoff: China prepares to ramp up tension with India, deploys nuclear missiles near LAC
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Leh: India and China have been engaged in a military confrontation on the Line of Actual Control (LAC) in eastern Ladakh for more than three months after Chinese troops intruded into Indian territory.


The confrontation took a turn for the worse after Indian and Chinese soldiers clashed in the Galwan Valley on the night of June 15-16. The incident led to the martyrdom of 20 Indian soldiers while more than 100 were killed on the Chinese side.


Both sides tried to defuse the tension with several rounds of military-level dialogue which has led to partial disengagement on the border.


However, worrying news have emerged from the Chinese side of the LAC with reports emerging that China has deployed nuclear missiles near the border with India.


China has reportedly placed some of its nuclear weapons close to the Indian border in Kashgar, Xinjiang.


According to a paper written by a Chinese ex-military officer and reported by the Indian media, China has the capability to carry out a nuclear attack on India within minutes.




According to a letter published by Yang Chengjun, China has completed a missile attack early warning system, intensifying its nuclear programs. China can also detect enemy nuclear missiles and retract using nuclear weapons within minutes before mainland China is hit. This will allow China to launch a nuclear attack on India or the US before Indian or American missiles hit the Chinese target.


Yang said that the development of such systems requires advanced missile defense technologies to integrate artificial satellites to detect missile launches with sea-based radar. Yang also emphasized that China's nuclear capability has become comparable to other nuclear countries, including the US and Russia.


According to the investigation, China has started the construction of an underground nuclear base in Kashgar. This construction started even before the Sino-India confrontation in Ladakh. Experts believe that the underground construction can be used by Beijing to conceal nuclear weapons and in case of a strike by New Delhi, Beijing can quickly and effectively hit Indian targets.


Kashgar airbase is 475 kilometers from the Karakoram Pass and is seen as a direct deployment against India. Kashgar is 690 kilometres from the Finger 4 area of Pangong lake which has been the biggest flashpoint. The distance of Daulat Beg Oldi is over 16,000 feet from India's airspace in eastern Ladakh and its distance from Kashgar is 490 km.


Along with this, a fighter aircraft base has also been built here, which provides direct attack as well as protection from satellite/air espionage. It has an estimated depth of 8 meters and possibly a square section below two of these shelters has been dug to a depth of about 15 meters.


Kashgar airbase has long been deploying surface-to-air missiles as well as JH-7 and J-11 aircraft, but China has recently deployed H-6 bombers.




Although China follows the First No First Use (NFU) nuclear policy, Western analysts have always doubted the Chinese NFU policy in almost all assessments.


Amidst border dispute and tension with India, China has made the Himalayan region the hub of testing its new weapons. The howitzers and HJ-10 anti-tank missiles mounted on a 122-mm military vehicle in a live-fire exercise were tested last month. Not only this, China also tried to create strategic pressure by releasing the news of this exercise in the media.


China's intrigue over the LAC is worrisome because some changes to the weapons involved in the maneuver have been observed. A low-caliber Howitzer cannon at an altitude of 4,600 meters and HJ-10 anti-tank missiles with 2 launchers instead of four were seen.


These changes are believed to have been made according to the hilly areas so that weapons of lesser weight and length can be easily carried in greater numbers when needed.


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